A Doughnut Shaped Recovery for Greater Victoria

Register Now

Can doughnut economics help us build a just recovery that is within our ecological limits?

Are you a municipal leader or planner? A local business owner? A community leader? An interested community member? Are you working to merge social and environmental values in your work?

Join us to hear from Andrew Fanning of the Doughnut Economics Action Lab in Oxford, Julia Lipton, Head of Innovation for C40 Cities in Copenhagen, Councillor Ben Geselbracht from Nanaimo and other municipal and community leaders in regions that are implementing a Doughnut Economics approach.

Kate Raworth’s idea of Doughnut Economics, is arousing a great deal of interest. The idea is simple. The economy has to be large enough to provide a decent standard of living for everyone (food, shelter, sanitation, education etc.), but small enough to stay within our ’ecological ceiling.’

Amsterdam has pioneered it, other European and North American cities are following their lead and here in Canada, the City of Nanaimo recently agreed to adopt it. Greater Victoria is coming together to talk about it.

More information on Doughnut Economics:

– See this series of 7 very short videos from 2017, starting here
https://www.kateraworth.com/animations/
https://doughnuteconomics.org/tools-and-stories/2
– or this longer TED Talk version
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rhcrbcg8HBw
– or this webpage – About Doughnut Economics
https://doughnuteconomics.org/about-doughnut-economics
– Information on Businesses and Doughnut Economics
https://doughnuteconomics.org/faq/businesses-and-the-doughnut
– The Doughnut Economics Action Lab (DEAL)
https://doughnuteconomics.org/
– DEAL is turning the ideas of Doughnut Economics into practice, and we are engaging in
some pioneering initiatives and pilot projects with cities, communities, educators,
businesses and governments to do so. Here’s an overview of our work to date.
https://doughnuteconomics.org/projects
– Three Times Colonist columns on this issue by Trevor Hancock 31 January 2021 – True prosperity is doughnut-shaped
https://www.timescolonist.com/opinion/columnists/trevor-hancock-true-prosperity-is-doughnut-shaped-1.24275001
-7 March 2021 – Circles and Doughnuts – The local economy we need (Published as ‘Circular
economy doesn’t go far enough’)
https://www.timescolonist.com/opinion/columnists/trevor-hancock-circular-economy-doesn-t-go-far-enough-1.24291204
– 14 March 2021 – A Doughnut economy for Victoria (Published as ‘Doughnut economy means
not spending $100M on interchange’)
https://www.timescolonist.com/opinion/columnists/trevor-hancock-doughnut-economy-means-not-spending-100m-on-interchange-1.24294174

Family Day 2021 Fact Sheet: No Family Left Behind

Family Day Fact Sheet: No Family Left Behind 

BC Family Day is a day that allows us to be together, celebrate one another and embrace all that is good about those who enrich our lives and to feel connected.

Did you know that 1 in 11 families living in the Greater Victoria Region are living in low-income?  The purpose of this fact sheet is to bring awareness that even though we may all be in the same storm, we are not all in the same boat. As we celebrate this BC Family Day, lets make sure that No Family Gets Left Behind.

🚨 NEWS: Victoria’s Times Colonist Reports on Financial Inclusion for the Green Economy Project

In the early summer, the Times Colonist sat down with Mikaila Montgomery, research coordinator at the council and discussed our Financial Inclusion in the Green Economy project- a project that sets its sights on addressing inequalities between genders by identifying current and future barriers to financial inclusion for women in the green economy.

For more on this story, click here

Vital People: Project aims to help women succeed in green economy

The Community Social Planning Council of Greater Victoria has embarked upon a project that sets its sights on addressing inequalities between genders by identifying current and future barriers to financial inclusion for women in the green economy.

The project, Financial Inclusion for the Green Economy, is hosted by the Community Social Planning Council, working collaboratively with Victoria Community Micro-Lending, the Inclusion Project, Sewlutions and Synergy Enterprises.

Read More

Financial Inclusion for the Green Economy

Financial Inclusion for the Green Economy is an ongoing project that will lead to a full report released by the CSPC.

F.I.G.E. creates a safe space and participatory action research engaging women from a host of diverse communities in order to identify current and future barriers to financial inclusion in the green economy. Working in partnership with Victoria Community Micro- Lending, the Inclusion Project, Sewlutions and Synergy Enterprises, our goal is to advance gender equality through participatory action research. The final report will include levers for change, enabling the project to shift economic, political, and social power, towards increased equality. The project report will begin a local process for ensuring the inclusion of the green economy as we build it. For the priority of Planet, FIGE strengthens participation of disadvantaged women in the green future.

Greater Victoria household expenses up, but living wage for families down.

2019 Living Wage for families: $19.39.

May 1, 2019

(Greater Victoria) Household expenses for raising a family in British Columbia increased again from 2018 to 2019. And if it hadn’t been for government policy – most notably BC’s new Affordable Child Care Benefit – the increase would have been close to ten thousand dollars, says the Community Social Planning Council of Greater Victoria, in its 2019 Living Wage report released today.

However, new government policy initiatives actually reduced the living wage for eligible families. The Affordable Child Care Benefit, the Child Care Fee Reduction Initiative, and cuts to MSP premiums actually outweighed the increased cost of living, and reduced the wage needed to form a living wage. “This demonstrates that good government policy can be an effective tool for reducing poverty,” says Diana Gibson, CSPC Senior Researcher and co-author of the report, “and it shows the great opportunities for making change in other key areas – like housing – that are driving that cost of living.”

A $19.39 hourly wage is needed to cover the costs of raising a family in Greater Victoria, down from $20.50 per hour in 2018. The Living Wage is the hourly wage that two working parents with two young children, aged 4 and 7, must earn to meet their basic expenses (including rent, child care, food, and transportation), once government taxes, credits, deductions and benefits have been taken into account. The family Living Wage for our region is calculated annually by the Community Social Planning Council of Greater Victoria (CSPC).

“A $19.39 hourly living wage may seem high to some, but it is based on a bare-bones budget for a family of four in our region,” said Diana Gibson. “It doesn’t include any savings for vacations, childrens’ education, retirement, caring for elderly parents, or home purchase.”

Housing and child care continue to be the two biggest costs in the living wage calculation. Over the last year, the median rent for a 3+ bedroom unit in Greater Victoria has gone up by $135 per month, more than an 8 per cent increase. In some areas of the region, this increase is much more pronounced. Child care costs are high, but are nearly covered by the federal and BC child-related benefits. …/2

“While the decline in living wage for families this year is welcome, the cost of living is on a long-term upward trend. And the cost of living in the Greater Victoria region is one of the highest in BC,” said Halena Seiferling, Campaign Organizer for the Living Wage for Families Campaign. Living wage reports for several locations in BC also were released today.

Over 140 employers across BC, employing more than 20,000 workers, have been certified as Living Wage Employers. These include the Huu-ay-aht First Nations, Vancity, the United Way of the Lower Mainland, the City of Quesnel, the City of Port Coquitlam, and in Greater Victoria, certified Living Wage Employers include Central Saanich, the City of Victoria, Pacifica Housing, Urban Solar, and Community Plus, the Vancouver and District Labour Council, to name a few.

Working poverty is a Canada-wide issue. Over 50 communities across the country, including 18 in BC, have active living wage campaigns and are advocating to improve quality of life for low-wage workers.

For full report click here.

Background: Living Wages across BC

Living wage rates in many across the province are similarly lower this year: Columbia Valley ($15.92), Comox Valley ($15.28), Cranbrook ($14.38), Fraser Valley ($15.54), Greater Trail ($18.83), Greater Vancouver ($19.50), Kamloops ($14.38), Nelson ($18.46), North Central Region ($14.03), Parksville-Qualicum ($15.81) and Revelstoke ($18.90).

Community Living Wage Year Calculated
Metro Vancouver $19.50 2019
Greater Victoria $19.39 2019
Revelstoke $18.90 2019
Greater Trail $18.83 2019
Nelson $18.46 2019
Columbia Valley $15.92 2019
Parksville-Qualicum $15.81 2019
Fraser Valley $15.54 2019
Comox Valley $15.28 2019
Cranbrook $14.38 2019
Kamloops $14.38 2019
North Central Region $14.03 2019