Bastion Square Public Market – Common Ground Community Mapping Inclusion Project

Exciting News! Join us this Thursday, August 3rd, at the Bastion Square Public Market as we showcase our groundbreaking Common Ground Community Mapping Inclusion Project in partnership with Community Living BC.

Share your experiences on a large map of the CRD with sticky notes. Spin the wheel for fun prizes, take surveys on community inclusion, and record video responses at our ring-light station. Let's build an inclusive CRD together! See you there!

This project is in partnership with

logo-e1527801547458

Supplies at the event are provided by

sticker-mule-logo-light

Learn more: https://mule.to/p3nd

Preserving Paradise: A Hopeful Transformation of Public Transit

Imagine a breathtaking island community where golden sunsets, towering trees, and thriving coastal waters allure residents and tourists alike. However, beneath this paradise, a pressing challenge looms over its transportation system, impeding progress on accessibility and environmental sustainability while jeopardizing the cherished natural vistas.  

During a recent trip to Cowichan Lake, I witnessed glaring transportation issues on a mid-July weekend. Lanes were congested with solo commuters seeking refuge from the bustling South Island. Campsites at recreational facilities overflowed with four, five, and even six vehicles for a similar number of campers. Despite over 70 available sites, not one was occupied by a walk-in, cyclist, or transit user. Surprisingly, despite being a mere 100km away from the island's largest population center, Victoria, there's no public transportation option to access the campground.  

The Need for Change - The Malahat(e)  

This is a critical problem, as both our population and the desire to access natural spaces continue to grow. We must seize the opportunity to explore world-class natural spots on the island without solely relying on private vehicles. Not too long ago, the island made headlines for its dismal public transit network. The time for change has come – a transportation and cultural shift that can positively impact the island's future. Major arteries like the Malahat suffer from significant bottlenecks primarily due to personal vehicle travel. While some may consider roadway expansion the only feasible solution, we can create a well-researched alternative by establishing frequent and affordable bus services presenting measurable positive impacts on transit across the Malahat.  

Embracing an Inclusive Transit System  

Regardless of our preferences in transportation, we should all strive to create a province where access to mobility isn't a barrier but a gateway to opportunity. Our collective consciousness seems to equate personal vehicles with ultimate freedom – a belief that has marginalized seniors, students, people with disabilities, and others without access to private vehicles, limiting their mobility within their home province. A thriving BC is one where mobility is a right, not a privilege. By embracing an improved bus transit system, we can bridge gaps in mobility and create more inclusive communities. Transit equity means ensuring no one is left behind, allowing everyone to easily reach their workplaces, schools, leisure spots, and essential services.  

Ecological Preservation and Climate Change Mitigation  

The reason so many call this place home and others yearn to do the same lies in its natural beauty. We share a collective responsibility to preserve it for future generations. From towering trees to expansive valleys and rugged coastlines, the island offers something for everyone. Transitioning to a reliable and sustainable transit network provides an opportunity not only to reduce our carbon footprint but also to embrace clean energy technologies and protect our environment. By prioritizing private vehicle access over the larger public good, we have contributed to environmental damage. One of the goals of the Clean BC Roadmap to 2030 is to reduce the number of private vehicles on the roads by 25 percent across the province. We can achieve this by creatively implementing alternative solutions to the current status quo.  

Improving Transit in Tourist Destinations  

Tofino, a jewel of the island, attracts tourists from far and wide, with some travelling from the other side of the planet to bask in its sunsets at the end of the road. However, due to a lack of access, roads in high season are often congested, parking lots packed, and the tranquil beauty of the Pacific Rim can feel more like an amusement park than a protected natural area. Offering a convenient, eco-friendly alternative can reduce congestion, preserve picturesque landscapes, and promote sustainable tourism. During July and August, Tofino hosts an average of 6,600 visitors each day - how many arrive by private vehicle with not much more than a suitcase and a backpack for a long weekend of fun? Let's explore publicly funded park bus services with sufficient storage capacity for surfboards, tents, and other items typically associated with personal vehicles.  

Addressing Transit Gaps in Rural Areas  

Tucked away in the rainforest near the mouth of the Juan de Fuca and Port San Juan lies Port Renfrew. Despite a lack of transit options, this community receives countless surfers, hikers, and photographers every year. Despite its relative proximity to Greater Victoria and the Cowichan Valley, residents must rely on private vehicles to access services located outside of town. Furthermore, those who wish to access the area have no alternatives to the growing congestion on the route beyond an expensive private trail bus. The presence of a private service where there should be a public good indicates a need for improved transportation through the corridor. Transit accessibility should not be driven by the path of least resistance or profit but by empowering anyone with mobility. Connecting rural areas is about public safety, equity, and accessibility, especially for vulnerable populations such as indigenous women and those within the 2SLGBTQ community.  

The Dedicated Right of Way to a Better Future  

We stand on the cusp of a transportation revolution that will define the island's future. Sacrificing irreplaceable ecological areas for the convenience of personal vehicle access should not even be a debate - especially when viable alternatives are both more effective and cost-efficient for both taxpayers and the health of our home. In fact- for every dollar invested in public transportation, communities generate four dollars in economic activity. Let's prioritize accessibility, sustainability, and inclusivity while building a future where everyone can thrive. If our vision for a successful transportation network is solely motivated by profit, we will never achieve transit equity. The ability to connect cities, regions, and communities regardless of distance will most likely never be profitable. Public transportation should not exist through a profit lens; instead, we should view our ROI as the enhancement of community connection, improved access to amenities and natural spaces, enhanced tourism, reduced emissions, and a paradigm shift in how we perceive transportation in our region and province. 

This is the fourth blog in a series on transportation equity in the region.

Published: July 26, 2023

Author(s):

Khadoni Pitt Chambers, Research Coordinator

Untitled design (18)

Whether it be climate equity, community innovation, housing affordability, or economic justice, be a part of the conversation when you sign up for our monthly newsletter!

Navigating the Future: Creating a More Inclusive and Sustainable Ferry Network

Connecting Coastal Communities: The Need for Change 

Imagine an early summer morning on Malcolm Island, where the sun bathes the landscape in a warm glow, accompanied by a gentle breeze from the Queen Charlotte Strait. The awe-inspiring peaks of the Broughton Archipelago stretch across the horizon. While this picturesque community feels like a slice of heaven on Earth, its existence today relies heavily on the BC Ferries system. However, recent challenges and frustrations have reignited discussions about the potential benefits of bringing BC Ferries back under complete provincial control.   

Prioritizing Accessibility Over Profits 

BC Ferries plays a crucial role in connecting communities across coastal BC. Yet, the current profit-driven model often neglects the needs of the residents. By establishing a provincially owned and operated network, we can prioritize accessibility for all residents over profits, returning the ferry system to its roots as a true extension of the BC Highway system. Our provincial government, with considerations for the broader public interest, could ensure that ferry services are affordable, dependable, and accessible to the communities that rely on them as a lifeline. This means expanding and maintaining reliable service levels to the Gulf Islands and even more remote communities like Sointula and Alert Bay. Allowing us to promote transportation equity while supporting economic development and the livelihoods of those that live in regions with limited transportation options.   

Improving Service Reliability Through Strategic Investments 

To improve service reliability, we must prioritize investments in infrastructure, vessel maintenance, and staff recruitment. Many BC Ferries workers are employed on short-term contracts, many of which are characterized by infrequent hours and relatively low entry pay for the level of work and certification requested. Creating an environment where employees are able to access adequate resources, consistent schedules, and competitive salaries will be paramount. Ensuring a positive work environment will allow us to enhance service reliability and contribute to a more positive travel experience for passengers while strengthening our overall transportation network. Providing better job security and opportunities for career advancement will not only attract skilled workers but also motivate them to perform at their best, ultimately contributing to a more positive travel experience for passengers and strengthening the overall transportation network.  

Long-Term Stability and Adaptation Through Provincial Control 

A BC Ferries under provincial control could allow for long-term strategic planning and stability, enabling the province to adapt more readily to a shifting region. Government oversight could facilitate strategic decision-making that factors in the needs of communities, the environment, and long-term sustainability. With a coordinated approach, we could achieve efficient route management, optimized schedules, and improved integration with other modes of transportation at points of origin and destinations. A more holistic and interconnected transportation network begins with a coordinated ferry system that operates with increased oversight and accountability. By considering the broader public interest, a provincially controlled BC Ferries system can foster a more holistic and interconnected transportation network, benefiting both residents and visitors alike.  

Equity and Mobility: A Core Concern 

Equitable mobility should be the core concern for any transportation network, especially one that over 800,000 British Columbians rely on to access the mainland of their province. As the island and its neighbouring archipelagos continue to grow in population, it is crucial to strengthen a transportation network that is independent of market forces. BC Ferries, as a government-run entity, could make decisions based on the needs of the public and the communities served, reducing uncertainty for those who live in communities dependent on ferry schedules. It would also make many areas on and around the island more accessible to live, work, and play.   

Embracing Sustainability for a Greener Future 

As we recognize the urgency of addressing climate change, our ferry system presents an opportunity to prioritize sustainability throughout our fleet. By investing in greener technologies such as hybrid or electric vessels and implementing environmentally friendly practices like more coordinated scheduling and optimized routes, BC Ferries can contribute to a more sustainable future. Coordinated planning with other modes of transportation, such as buses, trains, and cycling infrastructure, can further encourage multimodal travel options and reduce reliance on personal vehicles- further reducing greenhouse gas emissions. By adopting these sustainable practices and integrating them into the ferry system, BC Ferries can not only mitigate its environmental impact but also serve as a model for other transportation networks striving for a greener and more sustainable future.  

Looking Ahead: Thoughts From the Sundeck 

Our ferry system's challenges can be addressed by reimagining it under public control. A provincially owned and operated ferry system, prioritizing accessibility and sustainability, can better serve the needs of coastal communities, travellers, and this beautiful place we call home. We continuously invest in our transportation networks, like our motorways, because we recognize their essential role in mobility. Running ferries through a profit-focused lens will never yield the level of service, reliability, and equity that is required of an essential service.    

As we navigate the future of the transportation network, we shouldn't be so quick to dismiss the idea of re-absorbing the ferry system under public control. It is a valuable endeavour that could lead to a more efficient, inclusive, and environmentally conscious ferry network where communities that depend on it have access to the essential service that BC Ferries should be. Reimagining BC Ferries under public control isn't just a visionary endeavour; it's a pivotal step toward forging an efficient, inclusive, and environmentally conscious ferry network that connects communities, empowers lives, and ensures that the breathtaking beauty of a Sointula sunset remains accessible to all. 

This is the third blog in a series on transportation equity in the region.

Published: July 6, 2023

Author(s):

Khadoni Pitt Chambers, Research Coordinator

Untitled design (18)

Whether it be climate equity, community innovation, housing affordability, or economic justice, be a part of the conversation when you sign up for our monthly newsletter!

New Housing Toolkit Promotes Innovative Housing Practices for Local Governments

As Canada grapples with a nationwide housing crisis, the focus on affordability has reached a critical juncture. While federal and provincial governments often take the spotlight in addressing the challenge, it is crucial to recognize the pivotal role that local governments play in the creation of more affordable housing stock. Local governments possess an array of tools that can influence housing costs, including zoning regulations, development charges, density bonuses, and property taxes. 

In an effort to empower municipalities across Canada, Community Social Planning Council of Greater Victoria (CSPC) is launching the “Local Government Levers for Housing Affordability” toolkit with funding from the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC). 

The toolkit provides a comprehensive overview of various tools and their municipal context, enabling local governments to make informed decisions. The toolkit highlights key tools and examples of policies and practices which are intended to make a difference in housing affordability, while addressing common challenges and proposing practical solutions. The toolkit also showcases illustrative scenarios that highlight successes in implementing these tools across diverse municipal contexts and addressing varying degrees of housing needs and affordability from coast to coast.  

Municipalities are at the forefront of the affordability challenges facing Canadian cities, and it is essential that they maximize all available avenues to improve housing availability and affordability. Unaffordability throughout our communities can drive individuals to seek more affordable living conditions elsewhere, resulting in labour shortages and stunted economic growth at a national level. Affordable housing is not just a social imperative but an economic necessity that supports business and individual prosperity, reinforcing local economies. We hope that by using this toolkit, local governments will be able to change their communities for the better, to become more affordable, prosperous, and inclusive.  

The launch of this toolkit marks a significant step towards a more optimistic future for housing availability and affordability in Canada. By recognizing the vital role of municipalities and providing them with the necessary tools and knowledge, we can collectively address our housing crisis.

We encourage Local Governments to look into the CMHC's Housing Accelerator Fund which aims to fund initiatives to increase housing supply.

Published June 27, 2023 

Author(s):

Khadoni Pitt Chambers, Research Coordinator

Aza Bryson-Bucci, Research Coordinator

Untitled design (18)
Aza (500 × 500 px)

Whether it be climate equity, community innovation, housing affordability, or economic justice, be a part of the conversation when you sign up for our monthly newsletter!

Local Government Levers for Housing Affordability

As we navigate in an era marked by a nation-wide housing crisis, all levels of government are under pressure to address the challenge, although local governments are on the front lines. Municipalities also hold a pivotal role in orchestrating the changes needed to address the affordability challenges facing Canadian cities. This toolkit outlines the many levers within municipal control that can significantly influence housing supply and affordability.

This toolkit is intended to help local governments across Canada, big and small, to understand and utilize all of the tools available to improve housing affordability by:

• providing an overview of tools and their municipal context;
• identifying success factors and key considerations for each of the tools; and
• sharing case studies and best practices that highlight successes in implementing the tools in a range of municipal contexts and for a diversity of housing types.

The optimal use of these municipal tools can change the trajectory of our current housing situation, creating a better future for housing availability and affordability.

Bridging the Gap: Promoting Equity Through E-Mobility and Active Transportation

In recent years, a quiet revolution has been taking place on the streets of cities worldwide. E-Bikes have been rapidly gaining popularity as a clean, efficient, and practical mode of transportation. As the province of British Columbia seeks sustainable solutions to address its transportation, climate, and equity challenges, its investment in e-mobility is finally coming online.  With a relatively mild climate, there isn't a better place in Canada to start moving people out of their cars and onto bikes. 

The province is following the Community Council’s E-bike Equity Model that was developed and piloted with the District of Saanich. This model includes a higher subsidy for lower income households. The pilot was part of the Community Council’s Climate Equity Program. The pilot has been hugely successful with the low-income targeted subsidy oversubscribed even before the higher income brackets. There was also unanimous approval to renew funding by the City Council where other jurisdictions have cancelled e-bike programs that were seen as inequitable. Transportation is the second highest cost driver for low-income households after housing meaning that and E-bike can be a game changer, not just for the climate and health but for poverty and low income. 

Shifting how people move through cities by enabling micro-mobility has yielded positive environmental and health results. We can significantly reduce carbon emissions, air pollution, and noise pollution within our cities by adopting alternative modes of transportation like E-bikes and incorporating them into our transportation continuum.  

As we see ourselves staring at a worsening healthcare crisis, promoting active transportation will be vital for improving public health. Although traditional bikes are a fantastic way of commuting actively, eBikes offer a unique solution as they enable individuals of varying fitness levels and abilities to enjoy cycling effortlessly. Encouraging cycling helps to promote physical activity, reduce sedentary lifestyles, and combat the growing concerns of obesity and other health issues associated with inactive lifestyles. Allowing both the province and the public to witness the significant health benefits that come with the adoption of eBikes as a fun and convenient means of transportation while fostering a strong cycling culture amongst younger riders and new immigrants.  

E-bikes also open up more commute and trip options for longer distances or carrying loads. Preliminary studies have found that individuals use e-bikes for longer trips than conventional bicycles, with an average distance per trip of 6.1km. That distance is longer than the average bike trip distance and car trip length within the largest municipality in the CRD   

For those battling the Colwood crawl and bumper-to-bumper traffic along Douglas, it isn't surprising that British Columbia's urban centers face significant traffic congestion. This congestion has led to frustrating commutes and wasted hours on the road for all users. An investment into active transportation by the province sets the stage for encouraging more people to leave their cars behind, reducing the overall number of vehicles on the roads. This reduction in traffic congestion has the potential to improve traffic flow, and reduce both noise and physical pollution within our cities- both of which will be necessary if we are looking to equitably densify our arterials and bolster sustainable developments centred around transitways.  

The E-bike Equity Model the province is following can relieve many financial burdens associated with car ownership, serving as a cost-effective alternative to the current status quo. Car ownership is often accompanied by substantial expenses, including fuel costs, maintenance, insurance, and parking fees. eBikes offer a cost-effective alternative- significantly reducing transportation expenses for individuals and families who don't necessarily want or need a car. As we look to improve affordability while enhancing the quality of life for British Columbians, getting more people moving more sustainably is an achievable goal. It is possible to dovetail social and climate equity. With no need for gasoline and significantly lower maintenance costs compared to automobiles, eBikes can help save money and increase disposable income. Furthermore, public investment in eBike infrastructure, such as more secure bike parking, better wayfinding, and trail widening projects, also benefits traditional acoustic riders.  

The E-bike explosion not only benefits their acoustic cousins but also has the potential to take their other e-mobility devices along for the ride too. With the emergence of electrified scooters, skateboards, and even unicycles, we must provide adequate infrastructure for all forms of e-mobility. This includes an often-overlooked form- the mobility scooter. Mobility scooters and other forms of micro-mobility for people with disabilities should need accommodation by right of way on multi-use and AAA paths. We can rethink the car as a default mobility device for many people by bringing them in for the active transportation revolution.   

If the province wants to add a more detailed equity lens to their rebates focused on e-mobility, it would be essential to address the gap for those who cannot ride traditional e-bikes. Pairing vital incentive programs alongside expanding active transportation infrastructure can lead to healthier, happier, and better-connected communities. We must plan for a future with fewer vehicles, less traffic, and more public and active transportation users. Unfortunately, the provincial VKT targets have been forgotten by many municipalities. The province's interest in meeting climate goals through VKT reductions opens the door to imagining a cleaner, more sustainable future for our transportation networks- but attracting and maintaining the ridership will require a coordinated approach from multiple levels of government.

The province's investment in eBikes presents many potential benefits, such as reducing environmental impacts through transportation, improving public health, alleviating traffic congestion, and boosting economic opportunities. E-bikes offer a compelling solution supporting us towards a cleaner, healthier, and more vibrant future. Let's help preserve the beauty of this place by embracing the electric revolution. We can pave the way for a greener British Columbia- albeit using less asphalt than we've used in the past.

This is the second blog in a series on transportation equity in the region.

Published May 31, 2023

Author(s):

Khadoni Pitt Chambers, Research Coordinator

Untitled design (18)

Whether it be climate equity, community innovation, housing affordability, or economic justice, be a part of the conversation when you sign up for our monthly newsletter!

Uber Approved for Victoria: Mobility for who, and at what cost? 

With Uber being given the go-ahead to operate within the region, many are rejoicing at the thought of being able to have an alternative to taxis in the city. Despite the fanfare, many equity seeking groups and individuals have come out in opposition against the ride-hailing giant’s emergence on the South Island. 

Our current public transportation network is plagued by relative infrequency, inconsistency, and lack of overall reach that leaves many residents and visitors alike frustrated outside of a few core routes. Even then, many routes have a critical lack of early morning or late-night services necessary to support a mobile workforce and region. In light of our current transit woes, Uber might seem like a low-hanging fruit ready to be picked. With the push of a button, you can potentially have rides on demand from doorstep to doorstep- convenience at its finest. Despite this, Uber could undermine both climate and social equity work that so many municipalities in the region have been working towards. 

New collaborative research from Wayne State, Mcgill, and the University of Maryland have found that Uber shifts individuals towards private vehicles and away from public transit systems. This pattern can lead to a reduction in services that are critical to providing many working-class residents with mobility.  

When services like Uber cannibalize ridership from public transportation many are left behind who do not have the means to access the new service. Uber pricing out many lower income riders will be forced to deal with the aftermath as the traditional transit services they rely upon lose market share. 

Furthermore, A report from the California Air Resources Board found that nearly 39 percent of vehicle miles traveled by ride-hailing companies such as Uber and Lyft could be referred to as “deadhead miles”; the number of miles you drive with an empty vehicle while either returning to a central point or by driving to a new destination to pick up a passenger. Because of this effect, personal rides using these services can result in trips that on average produce around 47 percent more emissions than they would have if done completely by private vehicle.  

The provincial climate plan calls for reducing vehicle kilometers travelled (VKT) 25% by 2030. If the region is looking towards reducing VKTs and bolstering active  transportation and public transit, Uber is the wrong direction to go. 

In a city as compact as Victoria, and in a region this tightly connected, the effects of Uber adoption have an even greater knock-on to transportation planning, and stand to erase the cultural shift that seems to be percolating towards favouring active and public transportation. Researchers have found that the denser a city is, the more likely it is that Uber will cause a disruption to the ratio of those who previously chose to walk, ride, or take public transit. All of which lead to more vehicles on the road, more dependence on personal vehicles, higher emissions, and ultimately- an undoing of the climate action work being done to promote alternative modes of transportation. Victoria currently has the highest percentage of those who choose to roll to work in the country, with 5.3 percent of commuting trips being done by bike. Victoria is second only to Ottawa-Gatineau in terms of those who walk to work, with 29.5 percent of downtown commuters choosing to walk to work downtown.  

Lastly, Uber occupies a space in the unregulated gig economy; allowing them to operate without the same pay rates, benefits, and protections that would be afforded to traditional taxi services. A failure on the province and municipalities in regulating these companies could potentially result in more employers searching for loopholes in employment law to cut corners and lower wages. Ride-hailing companies and others operating within the gig economy have the luxury of a workforce at the ready yet provide no rights or benefits to any of the workers that they employ.  

The province themselves have highlighted the need to not create a second class of workers, yet when workers within the gig economy are sick, injured or otherwise unable to work, they cannot rely on any form of compensation to make it to the next paycheque.  

“Creating a new class of workers with fewer rights/protections than employees, as this could entrench inequality by creating a second-class of predominantly racialized app-based workers that enjoy fewer rights and protections than employees”.  

Many gig economy workers are racialized, immigrants, and often working through apps like Uber, Door Dash, and Lyft due to a lack of other employment opportunities. These are individuals who many of which are already in precarious living and employment conditions. The prevalence of the gig economy in our daily lives sends a resounding message that we need to invest more into supports for employment within the service sector. Not only should advocacy be moving towards better pay, but also towards the creation of less precarious working conditions, more upward social mobility and ensuring that we are bolstering a sustainable workforce. 

The arrival of Uber in the region has generated excitement among those seeking an alternative to traditional taxis. However, the case from those opposed highlights the potential negative impacts on both climate and social equity efforts. It undermines public transportation, increases emissions within the city, and is generally counterproductive to reaching our sustainability goals. Furthermore, Uber's presence in the unregulated gig economy threatens worker rights and perpetuates inequality. Mobility for who, and at what cost?  

Additional reading:  

https://chicagounbound.uchicago.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1037&context=uclrev_online 

This is the first blog in a series on transportation equity in the region.

Published: May 18, 2023

Author(s):

Khadoni Pitt Chambers, Research Coordinator

Untitled design (18)

Whether it be climate equity, community innovation, housing affordability, or economic justice, be a part of the conversation when you sign up for our monthly newsletter!

Low-Income Targeted Climate Action Incentive Programs

As summer temperatures rise and the climate crisis accelerates, many are looking to build resiliency and move away from fossil fuels where possible. The heat dome in 2021 was one of many extreme weather events yet to come, claiming more than 700 lives across the province. Despite the desire to shift habits, improve personal well-being and comfort, and build a more sustainable foundation - not everyone is offered the same opportunities. Read the full report below.

Walking the Talk: Building Equity into Climate Programs

As Canadian cities roll out climate action plans to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in line with Canada’s objective of reaching net zero carbon by 2050, it is crucial that equity is embedded in each step in developing these plans. Embedding equity considerations in climate action plans can help disadvantaged communities that disproportionately bear the adverse effects of climate change to have the opportunities to participate in and benefit from climate action initiatives. Climate equity is a win-win for the wellbeing of the planet and for all communities, including low income, Indigenous, immigrant, LGBTQ2S+, visible minorities and people with disabilities. Read the full report below.

Lessons From Helsinki: Homelessness & Housing First Approaches

This event focuses on lessons from Finland in utilizing the Housing First Model.

This model has been successfully implemented in other cities and countries globally. In Finland this model is credited with helping to virtually eliminate experiences of homelessness. While more hidden forms of homelessness remain, such as staying with friends informally, this model has been successful at providing housing with dignity to thousands of Finnish residents.

Joining us at this event is Saija Turunen, who will share their experience with this model’s application in Finland. Also, Housing First Expert, Dr. Deborah K. Padgett, will be sharing her expertise related to this model. Additionally, this event will feature a community response, where local experts, including Nicole Chaland, will speak to this model’s applicability to our region. See below for a full list of panelists at the event.

Panelists include:

  • Saija Turunen - Head of Research, Y-Foundation, Finland
  • Deborah K. Padgett - Professor; McSilver Faculty Fellow; Affiliated Faculty, Department of Anthropology and College of Global Public Health, NYU
  • Nicole Chaland - Co-Lead: The Housing Justice Project, University of Victoria

---

The CSPC acknowledges the Songhees, Esquimalt, Tsartlip/W̱JOȽEȽP, Tseycum/WSIḴEM, Tsawout/SȾÁUTW, Pauquachin/BOḰEĆEN, T’Sou-ke, Scia’new and Pacheedaht Nations who have a historical and ongoing relationship to the land where our offices and work are based.

We also respect the wide diversity of nations and languages across the province. British Columbia is home to over 200 First Nations communities and approximately 50% of the First Peoples’ languages of Canada. For more information visit: https://maps.fpcc.ca/